Carlotta Corpron’s blossoms

Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) :: [Tree blossoms]; ca. 1930s-1940s; Gelatin silver print. | Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) :: [Tree blossoms]; ca. 1930s-1940s; Gelatin silver print. | Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988); [Lotus blossoms]; ca. 1930-1940's; Gelatin silver print; Amon Carter Museum of American Art; Fort Worth, Texas; P1988.16.91
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) :: [Lotus blossoms]; ca. 1930-1940s; Gelatin silver print. | Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Carlotta M. Corpron (1901-1988); [Lotus blossom]; ca. 1940s; Gelatin silver print; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of the artist; P1988.16.54
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) :: [Lotus blossom]; ca. 1940s; Gelatin silver print. | Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988); [Magnolia blossoms]; ca. 1930-1940; Gelatin silver print; Amon Carter Museum of American Art; Fort Worth, Texas; P1988.16.52
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) :: [Magnolia blossoms]; ca. 1930-1940; Gelatin silver print. | Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988); [Magnolia blossoms]; ca. 1930-1940; Gelatin silver print; Amon Carter Museum of American Art; Fort Worth, Texas; P1988.16.53
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) :: [Magnolia blossom]; ca. 1930-1940; Gelatin silver print. | Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988); [Tree blossoms]; ca. 1930's-1940's; Gelatin silver print; Amon Carter Museum of American Art; Fort Worth, Texas; P1988.16.142
Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) :: [Tree blossoms]; ca. 1940s; Gelatin silver print. | Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Photographer Carlotta Corpron had a brief but important career as an artist and a decades-long impact as a professor at Texas State College for Women (now Texas Woman’s University). In the 1930s and ‘40s she experimented with light, influenced by the ideals of the Bauhaus and the Institute of Design as brought to Denton, Texas, by László Moholy-Nagy and György Kepes. Her early photographs investigated how light transforms natural objects, but in later projects she took light itself as her subject, capturing its reflection and refraction in abstract compositions that sometimes involved cropping or combining multiple negatives. Corpron bequeathed her archive to the museum, which holds 138 prints, over 800 negatives, and the Carlotta Corpron Papers. [quoted from Amon Carter Museum]

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