Mexico (1931) by Sipprell

Clara Sipprell (1885-1975); The Sea at Mazatlan, Mexico; ca. 1931;  Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Purchase through gift of The Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.; P1984.1.278
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: The Sea at Mazatlan, Mexico, ca. 1931. Gelatin silver print. | Amon Carter Museum
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975); Lake Chapala, Mexico; ca. 1931; Gelatin silver print; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Purchase through gift of The Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.; P1984.1.281
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Lake Chapala, Mexico, ca. 1931; Gelatin silver print. | Amon Carter Museum

Women reading, dancing, strolling

Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in white dress, dancing outdoors]; 1960. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in white dress, dancing outdoors]; 1960. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman among trees], 1930-1960. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman reading outdoors], 1930-1960. Amon Carter Museum

Women’s portraits by Sipprell

Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in profile], 1930-1960. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in profile], 1930-1960. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975); Dorothea Perkins; ca. 1940's - 1950's; Gelatin silver print; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Purchase through gift of The Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.; P1984.1.260
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Dorothea Perkins; ca. 1940s-1950s. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975); Dorothea Perkins; ca. 1940's - 1950's; Gelatin silver print; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Purchase through gift of The Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.; P1984.1.260
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Dorothea Perkins; ca. 1940s-1950s. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in ruffled blouse],  ca. 1930-1960. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in ruffled blouse], ca. 1930-1960. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in long scarf],  ca. 1930-1960. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in long scarf], ca. 1930-1960. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman by window],  ca. 1930-1960. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman by window], ca. 1930-1960. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum

Women in Turkish costume

Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in Turkish costume], ca. 1930-1960. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Woman in Turkish costume], 1924. Gelatin silver print. Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Two women in Turkish dress drinking coffee], 1924. Amon Carter Museum
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Two women in Turkish dress drinking coffee], 1924. Amon Carter Museum

Sipprell by Sipprell, 1900-1970

Francis J. Sipprell (1878-1958) :: Portrait of Clara E. Sipprell, ca. 1910. Platinum print. Burchfield Penney Art Center. | src l’œil de la photographie (broken link; linked to l’œil homepage)
Francis J. Sipprell (1878-1958) :: Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975), ca. 1910. Platinum print. | src Burchfield Penney Art Center
Clara Sipprell :: [Fragment of portrait of Clara Sipprell], ca. 1900. Gelatin silver print. Clara E. Sipprell Collection. There is no mention on source whether this photograph was taken by Clara or Francis. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell :: Lucy Sipprell, ca. 1913. Platinum print. Scan from color transparency. | src Smithsonian American Art Museum
Allen Sipprell (1919-1998) :: Portrait of Clara E. Sipprell, ca. 1970. Gelatin silver print. | src Burchfield Penney Art Center

Clara E. Sipprell was one of America’s most important pictorial photographers of the early 20th century. Born in Canada, she moved to Buffalo, New York after her oldest brother Francis opened a photography studio. She worked part-time as an apprentice, but eventually dropped out of school to work full-time at his studio, where she learned all different types of photographic techniques. She partnered with him in 1905, and after working together for ten years and having many successful shows, she opened a studio in New York City and eventually traveled all over the world.

Clara E. Sipprell’s use of a soft-focus lens and her reliance upon entirely natural light gave her photographs an atmospheric effect and moody romanticism. She was a successful portraitist, photographing such notable people as Eleanor Roosevelt, Robert Frost, and Albert Einstein. However, she did not confine herself to that genre. Her landscapes, cityscapes, and still-life subjects were exhibited in national and international salons, galleries, and museums. There are over 1,000 photographs by Sipprell in the Amon Carter Museum collection, a gift from The Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.  The (then) Burchfield Art Center presented a solo exhibition of her work in 1991.

quoted from Burchfield Penney Art Center

Roses by Clara Sipprell, 1920s

Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Rose in glass bottle], ca. 1922. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Rose and figurines], ca. 1922. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Rose and figurines], ca. 1922. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Phyllis’s Roses, 1925. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Callas and Lilies by Clara Sipprell

Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Auratum Lilies, 1950. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Auratum Lilies, 1950. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Calla Lilies, ca. 1925. Gelatin silver print on tissue. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Calla Lilies, ca. 1925, printed ca. 1926. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Two Petunias or Hollyhocks

Clara Sipprell (1885-1975); [Two petunias]; ca. 1930’s; Gelatin silver print on tissue; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Purchase through gift of The Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.; P1984.1.660
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Two Petunias, 1930s. Gelatin silver print on tissue. | src Amon Carter Museum
Clara E. Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Untitled [two hollyhock blossoms resting on a platter], undated. | src Burchfield Penney Art Center

Tulips, ca. 1911 (Clara Sipprell)

Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Tulips, ca. 1911. Glass transparency. Additive color screen plate(*). | src Amon Carter Museum
Clara E. Sipprell :: Tulips, ca. 1911. Glass transparency. Additive color screen plate(*). | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art

(*) Additive Color Screen Plate or Screen Plate were known commonly by the product name: Autochrome, Filmcolor, Lumicolor, Alticolor. Used mainly between 1907 and 1935. Initially it has a glass support; later products on film supports. This process was the first fully practical single-plate color process. The Autochrome plate or Screen plate could record both saturated and subtle colors with fidelity, and since the screen and the image were combined, there were no registration problems. Nonetheless, it had its drawbacks: the exposure times were long, and the processed plates were very dense, transmitting only less than the 10% of the light reaching them.

The result is a soft, subdued, dreamy colored image. And grainy. Although the starch grain filters were microscopically small their random distribution meant that inevitably there would be clumping of grains of the same color.