Roses by Clara Sipprell, 1920s

Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Rose in glass bottle], ca. 1922. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Rose and figurines], ca. 1922. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: [Rose and figurines], ca. 1922. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Phyllis’s Roses, 1925. Gelatin silver print. | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Tulips, ca. 1911 (Clara Sipprell)

Clara Sipprell (1885-1975) :: Tulips, ca. 1911. Glass transparency. Additive color screen plate(*). | src Amon Carter Museum
Clara E. Sipprell :: Tulips, ca. 1911. Glass transparency. Additive color screen plate(*). | src Amon Carter Museum of American Art

(*) Additive Color Screen Plate or Screen Plate were known commonly by the product name: Autochrome, Filmcolor, Lumicolor, Alticolor. Used mainly between 1907 and 1935. Initially it has a glass support; later products on film supports. This process was the first fully practical single-plate color process. The Autochrome plate or Screen plate could record both saturated and subtle colors with fidelity, and since the screen and the image were combined, there were no registration problems. Nonetheless, it had its drawbacks: the exposure times were long, and the processed plates were very dense, transmitting only less than the 10% of the light reaching them.

The result is a soft, subdued, dreamy colored image. And grainy. Although the starch grain filters were microscopically small their random distribution meant that inevitably there would be clumping of grains of the same color.

Mesdames Morter at 4 x 14

Mesdames Morter (Dorothy Gladys Morter & Reta May Morter) :: Destiny ~ Self-Portrait, ca. 1918. | src 4 x 14 at Keith de Lellis Gallery
Mesdames Morter (Dorothy Morter & Reta Morter) :: Love Praying ~ Self-Portrait, ca. 1923. | src 4 x 14 at Keith de Lellis Gallery
Mesdames Morter (Dorothy Morter & Reta Morter) :: Dearheart ~ Self-Portrait, 1923. | src 4 x 14 at Keith de Lellis Gallery
Mesdames Morter (Dorothy & Reta Morter) :: Autumn Defying Winter ~ Self-Portrait, ca. 1918. | src 4 x 14 at Keith de Lellis Gallery

Vera Milcinovic, 1926

Arnold Genthe :: Vera Milcinovic, 7 January 1926. Nitrate negative. (detail) | src Library of Congress
Arnold Genthe :: Vera Milcinovic, January 7th, 1926. Nitrate negative. | src Genthe photograph collection (Library of Congress)

Decorative Study nº 1 Pomegranates, ca. 1906

Minna Keene (née Bergmann, Canadian born Germany, 1861-1943) :: Pomegranates, ca. 1910. Carbon print with some details reduced by hand. | src Stephen Bulger Gallery
Minna Keene (née Bergmann, Canadian born Germany, 1861-1943) :: Decorative Study nº 1. Pomegranates, Cape Town, South Africa, ca. 1906. Carbon print, mounted on exhibition board. Original photograph. | src Bonhams
A fine example of a signed exhibition-quality image of one of Minna Keene’s most famous of images, taken at her home in Cape Town. Using her young daughter Violet as the model, she created an iconic Pre-Raphaelite image, combining the beauty of a young girl with nature. This image was included in the famous Tate London Exhibition in 2016, Painting with Light alongside Julia Margaret Cameron, Millais, Emerson, Goodall, Hacker, Rossetti, and others. In 1911, “Pomegranates” was awarded Picture of the Year at the London Photographic Salon. [quoted from source]
Minna Keene (née Bergmann, Canadian born Germany, 1861-1943) :: Pomegranates (aka Decorative Study), ca. 1910. Green carbon print by Minna Keene. This photograph is believed to be of Violet Keene, her daughter, according to Getty Images. | src The Royal Photographic Society Collection, Victoria and Albert Museum, London via Getty Images

Lydia Lopoukhova, 1914

Arnold Genthe :: Lydia Lopoukhova, glass negative, February 4th, 1914. | src Library of Congress
Arnold Genthe :: Lydia Lopoukhova, glass negative, February 4th, 1914. | src Library of Congress