Perriand’s Léger inspired necklace

Detail of the image below. Note the silver choker, known as Collier roulement à billes chromées that Perriand wears.
Detail of the image below. Note the silver choker, known as Collier roulement à billes chromées that Perriand wears.
Charlotte Perriand in the Chaise longue basculante, B306 (1928, Le Corbusier, P. Jeanneret, C. Perriand) Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton Foundation, ph. by Pierre Jeanneret. | src Architectural Digest
Charlotte Perriand's ball-bearings necklace (Collier roulement à billes chromées - 1927)
Charlotte Perriand’s ball-bearings necklace (Collier roulement à billes chromées – 1927) | src Semantic Scholar
Charlotte Perriand (wearing her iconic choker) with Alfred Roth in Place Saint-Sulpice apartment-studio, Paris, 1928 
Courtesy: © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2021 / © AChP / src it art bag
Charlotte Perriand (wearing her iconic choker) with Alfred Roth in Place Saint-Sulpice apartment-studio, Paris, 1928
Courtesy: © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2021 / © AChP / src it art bag

Charlotte Perriand’s ball-bearings necklace was exhibited in 2009 at the exhibition “Bijoux Art Deco et Avant Garde” at the Musee Des Arts Decoratifs in Paris and, in 2011, in the show “Charlotte Perriand 1903-99: From Photography to Interior Design” at the Petit Palais. The necklace became, for a short period, synonymous with Perriand and with her championing of the machine aesthetic in the late 1920s and has subsequently attained the status of a mythical object and symbol of the machine age. This essay considers the necklace as an object and symbol in the context of modernist aesthetics. It also discusses its role in the formation of Perriand’s identity in the late 1920s, when she was working with Le Corbusier, and aspects of gender and politics in the context of the wider modern movement. [more on Semantic Scholar]

Fernand Léger :: Still life, Le Mouvement à billes (1926). Gouache and ink on paper. Signed with initials and dated 26.

 “I had a street urchin’s haircut and wore a necklace I made out of cheap chromed copper balls. I called it my ball-bearings necklace, a symbol of my adherence to the twentieth-century machine age. I was proud that my jewelry didn’t rival that of the Queen of England.”

Perriand had asked an artisan with a workshop in the Faubourg Saint-Antoine to make the piece out of lightweight chrome steel balls strung together on a cord. The piece was inspired by Fernand Léger’s still life “Le Mouvement à billes” (1926).

The necklace became a symbol of Perriand’s passion for the mechanical age […] (see also: Charlotte Perriand’s “Ball Bearings” Necklace on Irenebrination)

Fernand Léger :: Étude pour “Le Movement à billes”
Signed with initials F.L. and dated 26 (lower right). Gouache and ink on paper. | src Sotheby’s

“Art is in everything,” insisted Charlotte Perriand. […] When you see Charlotte’s chaise longue, chair, and tables in front of that immense Léger, you cannot imagine the design without the art—it is a global vision.

On an adjacent wall, Collier roulement à billes chromées (1927)—a silver choker made from automotive ball bearings that Perriand not only designed but wore—is placed next to a Léger painting, Nature morte (Le mouvement à billes) (Still life [Movement of ball bearings], 1926). [quoted from William Middleton review of the exhibition Charlotte Perriand: Inventing a New World, on Gagosian]

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