Girls with parasol in autochrome

ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03:  An autochrome of a young girl, daughter of the photographer, sitting in the shade in a garden, holding a parasol over her shoulder, taken by Etheldreda Janet Laing. In the summer of 1908 Laing took a series of autochrome portraits of her children in the garden of the family home, Bury Knowle.
Etheldreda Janet Laing :: A girl, daughter of the photographer [Janet], sitting in the shade in a garden, holding a parasol over her shoulder, taken in the summer of 1908 at the gardens of Bury Knowle House, Oxfordshire. Autochrome. | Getty Images
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03:  An autochrome of a girl, daughter of the photographer, with a parasol by a flower bed, taken by Etheldreda Janet Laing. In the summer of 1908 Laing took a series of autochrome portraits of her children in the garden of the family home, Bury Knowle.
Etheldreda Janet Laing :: A girl, one of the daughters of the photographer [Janet] wearing a bonnet, with a parasol by a flower bed, taken in the summer of 1908 at the gardens of Bury Knowle House, Oxfordshire. Autochrome. | Getty Images
An autochrome of her daughter sitting under a tree, taken by Etheldreda Janet Laing. Next to her, a basket overflows with ribbons and thread as she holds a length of fabric she may be embroidering. She carries a parasol to shade her face from the bright sunshine.
Etheldreda Janet Laing :: A girl, one of Laing’s daughters, Iris, with a parasol, sitting next to a basket of flowers and ribbons at the gardens of Bury Knowle House, Oxfordshire, ca. 1912. Autochrome. | National Science and Media Museum
Etheldreda Janet Laing :: Iris and Janet [daughters of the photographer] with parasol at the gardens of Bury Knowle House, Oxfordshire, between 1908-1914. Autochrome. | Getty Images

Please note that the dates in each Autochrome are not as accurate as they may be. The photos are dated as they were found in the respective sources. Also note that while Getty Images dates all Autochromes by Laing in 1908 the Science and Media Museum dates them between 1910-1914. At least the location seems not to be a matter for debate.

Girls in Kimono (1908-1912)

Etheldreda Janet Laing (1872-1960) :: Girl in a Kimono, 1908. An Autochrome portrait of the photographer’s eldest daughter (Janet) dressed in a pink kimono. The design of the kimono is mirrored by the flower arrangement beside her. Japanese style and art became increasingly popular in England at the turn of the twentieth century. | src Getty Images
Girl in a Kimono, ca. 1908. An autochrome portrait of Janet Laing dressed in a pink kimono, taken by Etheldreda Janet Laing. | Getty Images
Etheldreda Janet Laing :: Two girls in oriental costume, ca. 1908. An Autochrome of the photographer’s daughters dressed in Japanese-style outfits. They both have flowers in their hair, which is typical in the geisha ‘Shimada’ fashion. | Getty Images
Autochrome photograph by Etheldreda Janet Laing. Image shows Laing’s daughter Janet in Oriental dress. Taken circa 1912. | src Science and Media Museum

Although these Autochromes are dated in Getty Images 1908 (or ca. 1908), the original source: the National Science and Media Museum date them around 1912.

Étude de fleurs par Albin-Guillot

Laure Albin-Guillot :: Étude de fleurs [with vase], ca. 1930. Vintage fresson print. | src Seagrave Gallery
Laure Albin-Guillot :: Étude de fleurs [with vase], ca. 1930. Vintage fresson print. | src Seagrave Gallery

Margaret Bourke-White ca. 1930

Oscar Graubner (1897-1977) :: Margaret Bourke-White atop the Chrysler Building (close up), circa 1930
Oscar Graubner (1897-1977) :: Margaret Bourke-White with camera at the Chrysler Building (close up), circa 1930
‘The New Woman Behind the Camera’ review on Fortune Mag
Oscar Graubner (1897-1977)
Margaret Bourke-White atop the Chrysler Building (close up)
ferrotyped gelatin silver print, signed and inscribed 'To Edna Robb Webster with best regards' in ink on the image, framed, circa 1930
src Sotheby's
Oscar Graubner (1897-1977) :: Margaret Bourke-White atop the Chrysler Building (close up), circa 1930
Ferrotyped gelatin silver print, signed and inscribed ‘To Edna Robb Webster with best regards’ in ink on the image | src Sotheby’s
Oscar Graubner (1897-1977) :: Margaret Bourke-White atop the Chrysler Building (close up), circa 1930
Oscar Graubner (1897-1977) :: Margaret Bourke-White with camera at the Chrysler Building (close up), circa 1930 [detail]

The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

Adelaide Hanscom Leeson :: Frontis. The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, 1905. Photogravure. | src photogravure.com
Adelaide Hanscom Leeson :: Plate 2. The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1905. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. Scanned by University of California Libraries | src internet archive
Adelaide Hanscom Leeson :: Plate 2. The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1905. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. Scanned by University of California Libraries | src internet archive
Adelaide Hanscom Leeson :: Plate 2. The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1905. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. Scanned by Getty Research Institute. | src internet archive
Adelaide Hanscom Leeson :: Plate 2. The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1905. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. Scanned by Getty Research Institute. | src internet archive
Adelaide Hanscom Leeson :: Plate 2. The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1905. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. Scanned by Getty Research Institute. | src internet archive
Adelaide Hanscom Leeson :: Plate 2. The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1905. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. Scanned by Getty Research Institute. | src internet archive

Hanscom achieved her luminous and daring visionary allegorical tableaux style through sophisticated manipulation of her photographs including combination printing and painting directly on the glass plate negatives. The delicate gravures are printed on tissue and tipped into the book which is notable for its Arts-and-Crafts design, the subjects (both nudes and artists of the time like Joachim Miller, George Sterling and George W. James).

The first edition was printed on at least two different types of tissue, one limp and thin, and the other stiff and parchment-like. Dodge published many subsequent editions with Hanscom’s photographic illustrations, in at least three smaller sizes, all with halftones, sometimes in color. In a 1912 edition, Blanch Cumming, another San Francisco photographer, was inexplicably also credited, although no additional illustrations appeared. In 1906, the San Francisco earthquake and fire destroyed Hanscom’s entire studio, including her Rubaiyat negatives. A decade later she provided similarly dreamy illustrations for an edition of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnets from the Portuguese, but her Rubaiyat images represent most of Hanscom’s print legacy, as her silver prints are rare. [quoted from the Art of the Photogravure]

Publications of The Rubāīyāt of Omar Khayyām available online:

The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1905. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. Scanned by Getty Research Institute

The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1905. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. Scanned by University of California Libraries

The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1914. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. “Popular Edition“. Scanned by Getty Research Institute

The Rubaiyát of Omar Kháyyám, 1905. Published by Dodge Publishing Co. Plates on the Art of Photogravure

The Rubāīyāt of Omar Khayyām, 1912. New York : Dodge Publishing Co. Scanned by Cornell University Library, on Hathitrust

Lisy (portrait) by Anny Heimann

Anny Heimann :: Lisy. From :: „Die Kunst in der Photographie", 1905. Verlag von Wilhelm Knapp. Halle A/S
Anny Heimann :: Lisy. From :: „Die Kunst in der Photographie”, 1905. Verlag von Wilhelm Knapp. Halle A/S
Anny Heimann :: Lisy. From :: „Die Kunst in der Photographie", 1905. Verlag von Wilhelm Knapp. Halle A/S
Anny Heimann :: Lisy. From :: „Die Kunst in der Photographie”, 1905. Verlag von Wilhelm Knapp. Halle A/S

Schon fast lebendig

Aenne Biermann :: Orchid, ca. 1930. Gelatin silver print. [Detail] From : Aenne Biermann : Up Close and Personal at Tel Aviv Museum of Art
Aenne Biermann :: Orchid, ca. 1930. Gelatin silver print. [Detail] From : Aenne Biermann : Up Close and Personal at Tel Aviv Museum of Art
Aenne Biermann :: Schon fast lebendig. Orchid, ca. 1930. Gelatin silver print. © Collection Biermann family. | Museum Ludwig, Köln
Aenne Biermann :: Schon fast lebendig. Orchid, ca. 1930. Gelatin silver print. © Collection Biermann family. | Museum Ludwig, Köln
Aenne Biermann (1898 – 1933) :: Ohne Titel (Anthurium), 1927. Gelatin silver print. NGA purchase through Kicken Gallery, Berlin, 2018. | src National Gallery of Art
Aenne Biermann (1898 – 1933) :: Ohne Titel (Anthurium), 1927. Gelatin silver print. NGA purchase through Kicken Gallery, Berlin, 2018. | src National Gallery of Art
Aenne Biermann (1898-1933) :: Funkia 1926. Gelatin silver print. | src MoMA
Aenne Biermann (born Anna Sibilla Sternfeld, 1898-1933) :: Funkia 1926. Gelatin silver print. | src MoMA

Charlotte Perriand portraits

Charlotte Perriand in her studio on place Saint-Sulpice, Paris, 1928. The hands holding a plate halolike behind her head are Le Corbusier’s. Photo: Archives Charlotte Perriand | src Gagosian 
also here: Charlottte auréole mains de Corbu, 1928 © Archives Charlotte Perriand | l'œil de la photographie
Charlotte Perriand in her studio on place Saint-Sulpice, Paris, 1928. The hands holding a plate halolike behind her head are Le Corbusier’s. Photo: Archives Charlotte Perriand | src Gagosian
also here: Charlottte auréole mains de Corbu, 1928 © Archives Charlotte Perriand | l’œil de la photographie
Charlotte Perriand with Alfred Roth in Place Saint-Sulpice apartment-studio, Paris, 1928
Courtesy: © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2021 / © AChP / src it art bag
Charlotte Perriand with Alfred Roth in Place Saint-Sulpice apartment-studio, Paris, 1928
Courtesy: © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2021 / © AChP / src it art bag
Charlotte Perriand, probably in Japan, ca. 1954 / 1st Dibs
Charlotte Perriand © AChP. Photo / ndion
Charlotte Perriand, Yogoslavie, 1934 | Flickr
Charlotte Perriand (1903-1999) in Japan, 1954. Photo: Jacques Martin / AChP © Archives Charlotte Perriand / src W magazine

Perriand’s Léger inspired necklace

Detail of the image below. Note the silver choker, known as Collier roulement à billes chromées that Perriand wears.
Detail of the image below. Note the silver choker, known as Collier roulement à billes chromées that Perriand wears.
Charlotte Perriand in the Chaise longue basculante, B306 (1928, Le Corbusier, P. Jeanneret, C. Perriand) Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton Foundation, ph. by Pierre Jeanneret. | src Architectural Digest
Charlotte Perriand's ball-bearings necklace (Collier roulement à billes chromées - 1927)
Charlotte Perriand’s ball-bearings necklace (Collier roulement à billes chromées – 1927) | src Semantic Scholar
Charlotte Perriand (wearing her iconic choker) with Alfred Roth in Place Saint-Sulpice apartment-studio, Paris, 1928 
Courtesy: © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2021 / © AChP / src it art bag
Charlotte Perriand (wearing her iconic choker) with Alfred Roth in Place Saint-Sulpice apartment-studio, Paris, 1928
Courtesy: © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2021 / © AChP / src it art bag

Charlotte Perriand’s ball-bearings necklace was exhibited in 2009 at the exhibition “Bijoux Art Deco et Avant Garde” at the Musee Des Arts Decoratifs in Paris and, in 2011, in the show “Charlotte Perriand 1903-99: From Photography to Interior Design” at the Petit Palais. The necklace became, for a short period, synonymous with Perriand and with her championing of the machine aesthetic in the late 1920s and has subsequently attained the status of a mythical object and symbol of the machine age. This essay considers the necklace as an object and symbol in the context of modernist aesthetics. It also discusses its role in the formation of Perriand’s identity in the late 1920s, when she was working with Le Corbusier, and aspects of gender and politics in the context of the wider modern movement. [more on Semantic Scholar]

Fernand Léger :: Still life, Le Mouvement à billes (1926). Gouache and ink on paper. Signed with initials and dated 26.

 “I had a street urchin’s haircut and wore a necklace I made out of cheap chromed copper balls. I called it my ball-bearings necklace, a symbol of my adherence to the twentieth-century machine age. I was proud that my jewelry didn’t rival that of the Queen of England.”

Perriand had asked an artisan with a workshop in the Faubourg Saint-Antoine to make the piece out of lightweight chrome steel balls strung together on a cord. The piece was inspired by Fernand Léger’s still life “Le Mouvement à billes” (1926).

The necklace became a symbol of Perriand’s passion for the mechanical age […] (see also: Charlotte Perriand’s “Ball Bearings” Necklace on Irenebrination)

Fernand Léger :: Étude pour “Le Movement à billes”
Signed with initials F.L. and dated 26 (lower right). Gouache and ink on paper. | src Sotheby’s

“Art is in everything,” insisted Charlotte Perriand. […] When you see Charlotte’s chaise longue, chair, and tables in front of that immense Léger, you cannot imagine the design without the art—it is a global vision.

On an adjacent wall, Collier roulement à billes chromées (1927)—a silver choker made from automotive ball bearings that Perriand not only designed but wore—is placed next to a Léger painting, Nature morte (Le mouvement à billes) (Still life [Movement of ball bearings], 1926). [quoted from William Middleton review of the exhibition Charlotte Perriand: Inventing a New World, on Gagosian]

Perriand on her chaise longue

interior design
Charlotte Perriand in the Chaise longue basculante, B306 (1928, Le Corbusier, P. Jeanneret, C. Perriand) Photo: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton Foundation, ph. by Pierre Jeanneret. | src Architectural Digest

She recalls how in 1927 at the age of just 24 she marched into the studio of Le Corbusier in Paris and showed the master architect her designs in order to present herself as an architect. He looked at everything and then said, “Mademoiselle, we don’t embroider cushions here.” [src indion]

Charlotte Perriand on her famous Chaise Longue Basculante, which she designed with Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret, 1929. Charlotte Perriand. Inventing a New World (2019-2020) at Fondation Louis Vuitton | image src Klat magazine

The young woman bathed confidently in the sparkling energy of the “années vingt”, learned the Charleston, admired Josephine Baker, wore her hair cropped short and had a necklace made of chrome-plated balls, which she called her “ball bearings” – a provocation of industrial aesthetics. Modernism was gathering momentum. In her apartment, a car headlamp hung above her extending table made of materials used in automotive production. The direction was clear: we need to get away from the classical parlour. [src indion]

Perriand on the chaise longue basculante B306, which is included in the exhibition at FLV. Photograph courtesy of ADAGP. | src dezeen

Charlotte Perriand did not have to wait until her meeting with Le Corbusier to give vent to her creativity; it was long before then that she started to design pieces completely off her own bat. To be sure, the turning point came for her in 1927, when she read the Swiss architect’s two essays, Vers une architecture and L’art décoratif aujourd’hui, and had a revelation: “Those books made me see past the wall that was blocking my view of the future. So I took a decision: I was going to work with Le Corbusier.” But their first meeting was a disaster. She presented herself at no. 35 Rue de Sèvres, the studio that the Swiss architect and his cousin Pierre Jeanneret had set up in a long corridor that had formerly been the cloister of a Jesuit monastery (a building that was later demolished and replaced by a glass and concrete construction). She took out her drawings and when Le Corbusier asked her what she wanted, blurted out the only sentence she had prepared: “To work with you.” He looked her up and down through his round spectacles, glanced through the drawings and dismissed her with the words: “We don’t embroider cushions here.” Disheartened, Perriand turned on her heel, but not before telling Le Corbusier about her Bar sous le toit on show at the Salon. [quoted from Klat magazine]

Exposition Le Monde Nouveau de Charlotte Perriand at FLV (2020) | src UFVAB

These were not easy times for women: the world of architecture was peopled with extremely misogynous men. Charlotte felt herself to be a failure: she had not been able to get herself accepted. So it was a delightful surprise for her to find out, a few days later, that Le Corbusier had seen her furniture and was ready to let her join his studio to design the interiors of his new buildings. The mutual understanding between them in design would be so great that Charlotte Perriand’s name would be overshadowed and even erased by Le Corbusier’s, even though their collaboration would last for about ten years. [quoted from Klat magazine]

Parcours filmé de l’exposition Le monde nouveau de Charlotte Perriand | Retrouvez le parcours filmé de l’exposition ici: link to videos

Those were years of great complicity. The pair shared a passion for emptiness: “Vacuum is all potent because all containing,” as Taoism teaches us. But they would also be years filled with enthusiasms and jealousies, seeing that, after her divorce from Percy Kilner Scholefield, Charlotte discovered Moscow and Berlin, founded an association of artists and had a love affair with Le Corbusier’s cousin and partner Jeanneret, forming a fruitful and complicated relationship with him. Together they would embark on research into art brut, studying with Fernand Léger the shapes of pebbles on the beaches of Dieppe, the fractals of fossils and the trunks of trees. And together they would work until 1940. [quoted from Klat magazine]

Conception graphique et motion design du teaser de l’exposition « Le monde nouveau de Charlotte Perriand » présentée à la FLV. | src and link to video atelier bastien morin

In the summer of 1940 Charlotte Perriand left for Tokyo. Appointed, thanks to her friend, colleague and former intern Junzo Sakakura, an adviser on industrial design to the Japanese government; Perriand was supposed to stay in Japan for just a year and a half to prepare a major exhibition. She was to remain there for six years, as the war upset her plans, separating her from Jeanneret and leading her to finding a new love, Jacques Martin, who would become her second husband and the father of her daughter Pernette. From that time on, the life of this infinitely resourceful girl from the mountains, a skilled skier and off-piste enthusiast, but also a lover of the sea and fanatic swimmer, would be an unending series of encounters and discoveries in a continual process of renewal in order to try out new forms and unprecedented solutions. [quoted from Klat magazine]