Pimpernel by William Morris

William Morris :: Pimpernel, 1876. Designed by William Morris. Produced by Morris & Co., London. | src AIC
William Morris :: Pimpernel, 1876 (detail). | Morris and Company: The Business of Beauty at Chicago Art Institute

Morris and Company: The Business of Beauty

Artist, designer, and writer William Morris (1834–1896) founded Morris & Co. in 1861. The company quickly became regarded for the objects it designed and made for home interiors—handmade wallpapers, textiles, and furniture—and its style became synonymous with the British Arts and Crafts movement of the late 19th century. Morris was both an avid student of art history and devotee of the natural world, and his and his company’s works were characterized by a design vocabulary drawn from both European and Middle Eastern historical fabric designs and featured, and were titled after, flowers and plants.

Morris and his collaborators—which included his wife Jane Burden Morris, younger daughter May Morris, artisan and designer John Henry Dearle, as well as artists such as Edward Burne-Jones and Dante Gabriel Rosetti—considered themselves design reformers. They were on a mission to bring beauty back into the lives of their consumers through thoughtful design and production that foregrounded the agency of artisans and anti-industrial techniques. Accordingly, they experimented with dye recipes based on natural materials, revived hand-printing methods for fabrics and wallpapers, and reintroduced hand weaving for woven wool and silk textiles as well as pictorial tapestries. [quoted from AIC]

Specimen of ‘Pimpernel’ wallpaper, an almost symmetrical pattern of entwined pale-green foliage and pimpernel plants with small yellow flowers; Block-printed in distemper colours, by hand, on paper. Designed by William Morris; Design registered 1876; Printed by Jeffery & Co. for Morris & Co.; Part of ‘Volume 1’, a pattern book containing 25 Morris & Co. patterns from 1862-81 | src V&A

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