»Kupplerin« by Otto Dix

Otto Dix :: Kupplerin, 1923. Color lithograph on machine-made paper. Signed lower right.
Otto Dix :: »Kupplerin«, 1923. Farbige Lithographie auf Maschinenbütten. Signiert unten rechts. Herausgegeben von Karl Nierendorf. | src Karl and Faber Kunstauktionen

Im Jahr 1921 zieht Otto Dix für vier Jahre nach Düsseldorf, wo er sich in druckgraphischen Techniken weiterbildet. Er liebt die Großstadt, die Typen und Randgruppen, die er vor allem während der Nacht auf den Straßen und in den Lokalen trifft: Matrosen oder Artisten, Kriegsversehrte und Kriegsgewinnler, ebenso wie Prostituierte und ihre Kunden. Die „goldenen“ Zwanziger zwischen allumfassender Traumatisierung, Vergnügungssucht und frühem Konsumismus, zwischen schillernder Oberfläche und abgestorbenem Innersten reizt ihn zu grotesk-enthüllenden Bildsujets. In seinen Werken – wie auch in der vorliegenden Lithographie „Kupplerin“ – führt Dix dem Betrachter schonungslos den körperlichen Zerfall, die Defizite und Eigenarten seiner Modelle vor Augen. Sein neuartiger Realismus, für den die Zeitgenossen den Begriff „Verismus“ prägen, macht Dix – zusammen mit Max Beckmann und George Grosz – nicht nur zum Hauptvertreter dieser Kunstströmung in Deutschland, sondern auch zu einem der bedeutendsten Realisten in der Geschichte der Kunst überhaupt.

In 1921, Otto Dix moved to Düsseldorf for four years, where he continued his education in printmaking techniques. He loves the big city, the characters and marginal groups he meets on the streets and in bars, especially at night: sailors or artists, war invalids and war profiteers, as well as prostitutes and their customers. The “golden” twenties between comprehensive traumatization, pleasure-seeking and early consumerism, between shimmering surfaces and dead innermost parts provoked him to grotesquely revealing pictorial subjects. In his works – as well as in the present lithograph “Kupplerin” – Dix ruthlessly shows the viewer the physical decay, the deficits and the peculiarities of his models. His new type of realism, for which his contemporaries coined the term “Verism”, made Dix – together with Max Beckmann and George Grosz – not only the main representative of this art movement in Germany, but also one of the most important realists in the history of art in general. (Roughly translated by us from source)

Grit Hegesa, um 1920

Frieda Gertrud Riess :: Die Tänzerin Grit Hegesa, um 1920. | src Die Riess exhibit at Das Verborgene Museum
Frieda Gertrud Riess :: Die Tänzerin Grit Hegesa, um 1920. | src Die Riess exhibit at Das Verborgene Museum
Frieda Gertrud Riess :: Die Tänzerin Grit Hegesa, um 1920. | src Die Riess exhibit at Das Verborgene Museum
Frieda Gertrud Riess :: Die Tänzerin Grit Hegesa, um 1920. | src Die Riess exhibit at Das Verborgene Museum

Mia May (Goddess Astarte), 1919

Mia May in Die Herrin der Welt, Teil 5. ‘Mistress of the World part 5’: Ophir, die Stadt der Vergangenheit Ophir, the City of the Past, a UFA production directed Uwe Jens Krafft. Artistic direction and executive production: Joseph (Joe) May
Mia May in Die Herrin der Welt, Teil 5. ‘Mistress of the World part 5’: Ophir, die Stadt der Vergangenheit Ophir, the City of the Past, a UFA production directed Uwe Jens Krafft. Artistic direction and executive production: Joseph (Joe) May

Immediately after the First World War and the founding of the Weimar Republic, Joe May set up a gigantic project in his “Filmstadt” in Woltersdorf. Following the example of American and Italian monumental films and serials à la The Count of Monte Cristo, he brought out a series of eight consecutive, largely self-contained feature films at the end of 1919. His wife, the former operetta diva Mia May, played the leading role of the world traveler Maud Gregaard, who wants to take revenge on her father’s murderer and experiences all sorts of love and other adventures about it. The 5th part, in which Maud and her companion find the mysterious city of Ophir in the heart of Africa, is an adventure film that was staged with great effort – and May’s colleague Fritz Lang may have had to thank her for a few suggestions for Metropolis. [Deutsches Historisches Museum]

The large-scale film series about the adventuress Maud Gregaard, who becomes a modern »Countess of Monte Cristo« in eight parts, was produced in May 1919 and screened at weekly intervals at the end of the year. In Part 5, Maud, having just escaped from the natives of the Makombe tribe with her companion Madsen, ends up in the mysterious city of Ophir in Central Africa. There they mistake the high priests for the goddess Astarte, while Madsen is thrown to the slaves. With the help of the engineer Stanley, who is also enslaved, the trio finally finds the legendary treasure of the Queen of Sheba – and prepare their breakneck escape … A few kilometers outside of Berlin, in a gigantic studio recordings: Joe May’s “Filmstadt”, almost 30,000 people participated. [Film Archiv Austria]