Der neue Tanz: Tanzschule Trümpy

Das Leben Magazin, Sept. 1928, Band 6, Heft 3.
Tanzschule Trümpy. Das Leben Magazin, Sept. 1928, Band 6, Heft 3. | src Flickr
Tanzschule Trümpy. Wide World Photo. Das Leben Magazin, Sept. 1928, Band 6, Heft 3. | src Flickr
Ballett Mme. Komarova in der neuen Revue ‘La Grande Folie’ (Folies Bergère). Wide World Photo. Das Leben Magazin, Sept. 1928, Band 6, Heft 3. | src Flickr

Mary-Wigman-Schule, um 1927

Mary-Wigman-Schule, Dresden, um 1927. From: Rose-Marie Bachofen Fotoalbum ‘Jugend’ © Münchner Stadtbibliothek, 2020 | src Monacensia in Hildebrandhaus
Page 22. Rose-Marie Bachofen Fotoalbum ‘Jugend’ © Münchner Stadtbibliothek, 2020 | src Monacensia in Hildebrandhaus

Dancing with Helen Möller, 1918

“The idea of Pan inspires the Greek dancer with a charming variety of interpretations of a lyrical, as well as of a sprightly and mischievous, character.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Möller’, 1918. Page 110. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“An adaptation of the classic idea of Pan — three manifestations emphasizing the gay and mischievous attributes of that minor deity of the Arcadian woodland.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Möller’, 1918. Page 28. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“All true physical expression has its generative centre in the region of the heart, the same as the emotions which actuate it. Movements flowing from any other source are aesthetically futile.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller’, 1918. Page 96. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“Both of these Bacchante figures exhibit original interpretations in which beauty of line is sustained in connection with appropriate gestures and facial expression.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller’, 1918. Page 81. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“Bacchante. Showing the moment of lustful anticipation of delight in the intoxicating product of the fruit — as though hardly to be restrained from seizing and devouring at once.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller’, 1918. Page 102. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“Woodland interpretation. The ocean-born Aphrodite being adorned by Goddesses of the Seasons for her first appearance among her peers on Olympus.”
Helen Moller and Curtis Dunham :: ‘Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice and teaching formed upon the classic Greek model, and adapted to meet the aesthetic and hygienic needs of to-day’, 1918. Page 112. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive

ACKNOWLEDGMENT: Many of the photographs reproduced in this book were taken by the author herself. For the privilege of reproducing other fine examples of the photographer’s art, she desires to express her grateful acknowledgments to Moody, to Maurice Goldberg, to Charles Albin and to Underwood and Underwood; also to Arnold Genthe for the plate [lost plate] on Page 36; and to Jeremiah Crowley for his admirable arrangement of the entire series of illustrative art plates. [quoted from source]

Dancing with Helen Moller, 1918

“Votive incense, as from a novice to the Priestess of the Temple — an attitude of graceful humility combined with pride in serving.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller’, 1918. Page 62. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“Expressing wistful expectation — the hands in an upward receptive gesture and the countenance as of hope for some yearned-for gift from above.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller’, 1918. Page 22. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“Atalanta. Depicting the classical moment of the most intense physical and mental concentration upon two opposing motives — to win the race, yet pause to seize the prize.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller’, 1918. Page 24. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“Example of a very young dancer unconsciously coordinating movements of arms and torso with remarkably true and forceful expression of countenance.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller’, 1918. Page 38. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“Children are quick to feel the impulse to rise upon the ball of the foot even when that limb is sustaining the body’s entire weight — one of the principal requisites of Greek dancing.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller’, 1918. Page 32. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
“Representing joyous abandonment to an impulse of Nature’s gently persuasive mood — as of floating forward borne upon a Summer breeze.” From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller’, 1918. Page 90. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive
Arms outstretched, and raised together, in movements which avoid unaesthetic angles, even in the energetic action shown on the left. The open, raised bust in the large figure illustrates the hygienic value of adhering to the heart centre of all true physical expression.”
Helen Moller and Curtis Dunham :: From ‘Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice and teaching formed upon the classic Greek model, and adapted to meet the aesthetic and hygienic needs of to-day’, 1918. Page 92. University of California Libraries. | src internet archive

ACKNOWLEDGMENT: Many of the photographs reproduced in this book were taken by the author herself. For the privilege of reproducing other fine examples of the photographer’s art, she desires to express her grateful acknowledgments to Moody, to Maurice Goldberg, to Charles Albin and to Underwood and Underwood; also to Arnold Genthe for the plate [lost plate] on Page 36; and to Jeremiah Crowley for his admirable arrangement of the entire series of illustrative art plates. [quoted from source]

Lili Green in »Orientale«, 1915

Atelier J. Merkelbach :: Lily or Lily Green (Dancer and choreographer) in »Orientale«, 1915. Glass negative. | src Het Stadsarchief Amsterdam and Tanzfotografie: Historiografische Reflexionen der Moderne (pp. 96 to 111, this image on p.103)
Jacob Merkelbach :: Danseres Lily Green in »Orientale«, 1915. Collectie Atelier J. Merkelbach. | src Het Stadsarchief Amsterdam
more about Lili Green: Empire of Ecstasy: Nudity and Movement in German Body Culture, 1910-1935 pp. 145 to 154

Aleksandr Rumnev (Ziakin)

Dance pioneer Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Ziakin (1899-1965), known as Rumnev, who took his pseudonym from the family estate, Rumnia. | src The Calvert Journal (Poetry in Motion)

The tragic life of Sasha

Soviet dance pioneer Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Ziakin (1899-1965), known as Rumnev or Alexander Rumnev, took his pseudonym from the family estate: Rumnia.

Rumnev started dancing after Duncan’s show in 1905. Little Sasha Zyakin (Rumnev) had not seen Duncan’s performance in Moscow in 1905 (he only heard his parents talk about it), the boy «stripped himself of all his clothes, wrapped into a sheet and attempted to reproduce her dance in front of the mirror».

From an early age, Aleksandr Rumnev (1899-1965) dreamt of dancing, yet he could do it only after graduating from high school. In 1918 he took up ballet classes, and a friend brought him to Liudmila Alekseeva’s studio. For the talented student, Alekseeva choreographed several dances to the music by Rakhmaninov and a dance of the ocean wave to the etude by Carl Czerny. Tall, slim and flexible, Rumnev was a born dancer, and within a year he had already founded his own company. He also performed with other companies including Lev Lukin’s Free Ballet (see below). The art critic Aleksey Sidorov found him «stunning»; he believed that «even the West» could be proud of such dancer.
During the Civil War private dance studios experienced hard times for the shortage of rooms with heating. As a matter of survival, Rumnev suggested to create an umbrella-studio, A Search in Dance. The space was provided by Alekseeva, there Rumnev taught dance and pantomime, and other dancers gave classes of gymnastics, modern dance, rhythmical gymnastics, «expression» and «musicality». Yet in winter it was so cold that, sprayed with water to prevent sliding, wooden floor was quickly covered with ice.

In 1920 Rumnev joined the Chamber Theatre (Kamernyi Teatr) as a pantomime actor and teacher. He also choreographed his own «grotesque» dances commenting that «this was a tragic grotesque». One of his solos, The Last Romantic, to music by Scriabin, was about a «contemporary Don Quixote». Yet, for the new proletarian culture, Rumnev was «too refined, he moved too elegantly, waving with aristocratic narrow hands, striking with broken movement of long arms and legs». Critics found him old-fashioned and ‘decadent’. He was also gay which became criminalized under Stalin. In 1933 Rumnev fled Moscow. Several years later he was arrested in the provinces and served a prison sentence. In 1962 he finally succeeded in founding the Experimental Theatre for Pantomime, the genre he had been committed to from the beginning. Sadly, Rumnev died two years later, and his theatre did not survive his death.

quoted from Irina Sirotkina: The Revolutionary Body, or Was There Modern Dance in Russia?