The Breathing Dance, 1928

Ágnes Kalmár Kövesházi in The Breathing Dance [Lélegzőtáncban] (costume: Elsa Kalmár Kövesházi), Cikk-Cakk evenings, 1928, MTA BTK Institute of Art History | src Artmagazin

Breathing exercises played an important role in the Hungarian dance school. Air and breathing exercises also played a big role in Agnes Kövesházi’s life. Since she had lung disease, the regular practice healed the dancer’s body and soul. It is likely that this disease was also the inspiration for her choreography Breathing Dance [Lélegzőtáncban].

Around 1928, Elsa Kalmár Kövesházi made a plaster sculpture entitled “Breathing Dance” (image below). The sculpture was inspired by Ágnes Kövesházi, the sculptor’s daughter. In the 1920s, Agnes was the leading dancer of Alice Madzar’s artists movement and co-creator Ödön Palasofszky’s Quintessential Theatre. Her own dance composition, which ran under the same name, was the inspiration for her mother’s work. The photograph of Ágnes Kövesházi, in a position corresponding to the sculpture work of “Breathing Dance”, was also left for posterity. Her dress is the same fan-like as the sculpture. The costume was also made by Elsa Kalmár Kövesházi.

According to the idea of ​​Elza Kalmár Kövesházi, a costume should start from the character of the movement, amplifying its characteristics: her richly pleated costume, which visually emphasizes the movement of the body, conveys every breath of the dancer. She immortalized her daughter’s solo piece together with other choreographies of the Hungarian Artists Group (Csitsibua, Bilincsek) in sculpture, creating exceptionally beautiful art deco sculptures.

Elsa Kalmár Kövesházi :: Breathing Dance, 1928 (Ágnes Kalmár Kövesházi, gypsum, 28.3 cm, Hungarian National Gallery) | src Óbudai Antiksz
Elsa Kalmár Kövesházi :: Lélegzőtánc | Breathing Dance, 1928 (Ágnes Kalmár Kövesházi, plaster, 28.3 cm, Hungarian National Gallery) | src Óbudai Antiksz

Anne-Marie Merkel par Kertész

André Kertész :: Portrait of Miss R., 1926. Silver Gelatin Print on baryta paper. | src Städel Museum
The mysterious Mrs. R. exudes a strange mix of distance and intimacy, strength and fragility. Her heavy-lidded eyes are half closed and her melancholy gaze cuts straight through the onlooker. Kertész’s photographs are steeped in silent poetry.
André Kertész :: Anne-Marie Merkel, 1926. | src Art Institute Chicago
André Kertész :: Anne-Marie Merkel, 1926. Printed on carte postale paper. | src Art Institute Chicago
André Kertész :: Anne-Marie Merkel [Mme Repsz], Paris, 1926-27. | src The J. Paul Getty Museum
Anna-Marie Merkel was an artist from Berlin who, along with André Kertész, was a habitué of the Café du Dôme in Montparnasse. She was one of several women he photographed in 1927.

Renée Sintenis, ca. 1929-1932

Gerty Simon :: Renée Sintenis (1888-1965), Berlin, ca. 1929-1932. Sculptor and medallist. © The Bernard Simon Estate. From the exhibition Berlin/London: The Lost Photographs of Gerty Simon | src Wiener Holocaust Library Collections

Sculptress Hana Wichterlová

Josef Sudek :: Czech sculptress Hana Wichterlová (1903–1990). Photo kindly borrowed from the monograph Josef Sudek (ed. Kirschner Z.), Panorama, photography edition - personalities, 1958. | src Fler blog
Josef Sudek :: Czech sculptress Hana Wichterlová (1903–1990). Photo kindly borrowed from the monograph Josef Sudek (ed. Kirschner Z.), Panorama, photography edition – personalities, 1958. | src Fler blog
Josef Sudek :: Hana Wichterlová (sculptress), ca. 1953. From the series 'A walk in the garden of a lady sculptor' (aka A Walk in the Magic Garden), 1953–1959. | src Galerie Julian Sander
Josef Sudek :: Hana Wichterlová (sculptress), ca. 1953. From the series ‘A walk in the garden of a lady sculptor’ (aka A Walk in the Magic Garden), 1953–1959. | src Galerie Julian Sander
Josef Sudek :: Hana Wichterlová garden; Flowerpot | src Sudek Project archive
Josef Sudek (1896-1976) :: Hana Wichterlová garden; Flowerpot | src Sudek Project archive
Josef Sudek :: Hana Wichterlová garden; Flowerpot | src Sudek Project archive
Josef Sudek (1896-1976) :: Hana Wichterlová garden; Flowerpot | src Sudek Project archive
Josef Sudek :: Hana Wichterlová's Mrtvý pták (Dead Bird) (1931) | src Sudek Project archive
Josef Sudek (1896-1976) :: Hana Wichterlová’s Mrtvý pták (Dead Bird) (1931) | src Sudek Project archive
Josef Sudek :: Hana Wichterlová's Mrtvý pták (Dead Bird) (1931) | src Sudek Project archive
Josef Sudek (1896-1976) :: Hana Wichterlová’s Mrtvý pták (Dead Bird) (1931) | src Sudek Project archive
From: Wichterlová – Sudek / 2021 / Friendly dialogue of the original sculptures of the sculptor Hana Wichterlová with photographs by Josef Sudek

Maria Biljan-Bilger, vor 1954

Yoichi R. Okamoto :: Maria Biljan-Bilger, vor 1954. Bildnis im (zerbrochenen) Spiegel mit ihren Keramikskulpturen. Rückseite mit Nachlassstempel “Paula Okamoto, Bethesda, MD”. | Maria Biljan-Bilger, before 1954. Portrait in the (broken) glass with her ceramic sculptures. Reverse with estate stamp “Paula Okamoto, Bethesda, MD”. | src ÖNB