Payne in Confetti (Nelson revue)

Nina Payne (holding a mask) in costume for the Nelson revue “Confetti”, by Studio Manassé (1910s) | src liveinternet.ru
Nina Payne In costume for the Nelson revue “Confetti”, by Hill, ca. 1916 | src HZG
Dancer Nina Payne with a dance mask in the Nelson revue “Confetti”, Nelson Theater Berlin, 1925. Photo: Atelier Binder 1925 (Photo by Atelier Binder) | src Getty Images
Tänzerin Nina Payne (USA) in einer interessanten Tanzmaske in der Nelson-Revue “Confetti”, Nelson Theater Berlinerschienen Nr. 42/1925. Foto: Atelier Binder | src Getty Images

Lifar by Hoyningen-Huene, 1930

George Hoyningen-Huene (Russian, 1900-1968) :: Serge Lifar, 1930. Vogue magazine.
George Hoyningen-Huene (Russian, 1900-1968) :: Serge Lifar; Vogue ; Paris (1930) Heritage Auctions
George Hoyningen-Huene (Russian, 1900-1968) :: Serge Lifar, 1930. Vogue magazine.

Die Tänzerin Rea Egerváry

Atelier Manassé :: Flexible like a blade made of precious steel (Die Tänzerin Rea Egerváry). Scherl’s Magazin, Band 5, Heft 12, Dezember 1929
Atelier Manassé :: Biegsam wie eine Klinge aus edlem Stahl (Die Tänzerin Rea Egerváry). Scherl’s Magazin, Band 5, Heft 12, Dezember 1929 [full page]

Truempy dance school (1931)

Alfred Eisenstaedt :: Truempy dance school, 1931. Scanned by source (κώστας βακουφτσης) from photobook
Alfred Eisenstaedt :: Trümpy ballet school, 1931. Scanned by source (κώστας βακουφτσης) from photobook

Dancers at Trümpy dance school

Alfred Eisenstaedt :: Costumed dancers at Truempy Dance School looking at themselves in studio mirror, Berlin, 1930, for Life Magazine. | src Google Arts & Culture
Alfred Eisenstaedt :: Dancers at Truempy Dance School, Berlin, 1930-1931. | src Google Arts & Culture
Alfred Eisenstaedt :: First lesson at Truempy dance school, Berlin, 1930, printed in 1995. | src Sotheby’s

Mary Wigman dancing, 1930

Carry und Nini Hess :: »Mary Wigman beim Tanz« [Mary Wigman dancing], 1930. | src Jüdische Allgemeine

Vera Skoronel · Tanzschule Trümpy

Hede Rohr :: Wieviel Arbeit gehört dazu, um so schöne Beine zu ertanzen! (Vera Skoronel), Berthe Trümpy Tanzschule, 1929. Uhu Magazin, Band 5 Heft 4.
Hede Rohr :: Vera vor dem Spiegel: Die Tänzerin Vera Skoronel versucht einen neuen Tanz [Vera in front of the mirror: the dancer Vera Skoronel tries a new dance], 1929. Uhu Magazin, Band 5 Heft 4.

Olga Bontjes van Beek · Vom Tanz zur Malerei

Olga Bontjes van Beek, 1923. Archiv Saskia Bontjes van Beek. Olga Bontjes van Beek – Vom Tanz zur Malerei: 26.3.2022 und 27.3.2022. | src Deutsches Tanzfilminstitut
Olga Bontjes van Beek vor einem Vorhang von Bernhard Hoetger [Olga Bontjes van Beek in front of a curtain by Bernhard Hoetger]. Archiv Saskia Bontjes van Beek. Archiv Saskia Bontjes van Beek. | src Deutsches Tanzfilminstitut
Olga Bontjes van Beek, 1919. Archiv Saskia Bontjes van Beek. Olga Bontjes van Beek – Vom Tanz zur Malerei | src Deutsches Tanzfilminstitut

[26.3.2022 & 27.3.2022] The dancer, sculptor and painter Olga Bontjes van Beek is the sixth and youngest daughter of the painter Heinrich Breling – this scenic reading is part of the exhibition “Heinrich Breling and his daughter Olga Bontjes van Beek” of the Kunstverein Fischerhude in Buthmanns and is dedicated to her creative life and work.

The central feature of the event is the narrative of a selection of Olga Bontjes van Beek’s own texts, letters and notes on her art and on selected events in her life, photos of her choreographies, drawings and pictures by the versatile artist.

Olga Bontjes van Beek (1896-1995) studied dance at the Elizabeth Duncan School in Darmstadt and with Sent M’Ahesa and was later a student of the painter Fritz Mühsam in Paris. Her friends include Bernhard Hoetger, Heinrich Vogeler and Theodor Lessing.

Olga’s sketches, which she herself drew for her dance movements, are brought to life to a Debussy recording by the pianist Walter Gieseking, with whom the expressionist dancer toured in the 1920s. This specially made video animation conveys moving impressions of her art as a dancer. Olga’s stage photos, family pictures, theater programmes, reviews and postcards from the tours and some film excerpts bring the artist’s personality to life. The haunting, deep and powerful images from her later creative period show her as a painter.

Music recordings of the time enrich the event and convey a lively feeling of the epoch. Poems by artist friends and comments by friends such as Helmut Schmidt and Lew Kopelev also testify the fascination for the artist Olga Bontjes van Beek. [quoted from Deutsches Tanzfilminstitut]